EDIF project

EDIF_MorleyCollege's picture

Good practice for embedding LGBT cross-college

Morley College was used as an example of good practice for embedding LGBT cross-college in the curriculum at the British Council seminar on Thursday 13th February in an international live stream.

In her talk Laila El-Metoui, who has been co-ordinating Educate Out Prejudicedefinition with Carole Powell, suggests that in order for the education provider to be truly inclusive, the institution needs to have:

•             Zero tolerance policy – policy needs to be enforced through lesson observation

•             Visibility (posters displayed in prominent locations, course guide inclusive of diversity of students, etc.)

•             Teacher Training  / staff training on how to tackle discrimination

•             Teaching resources  (including induction materials) inclusive of LGBT, easily accessible

•             Paperwork  (forms, incident records, policy, etc.) that reflect the range of gender identity and sexual orientation

•             Forum to raise issues / concerns (does the complaint form include homophobia and transphobia)

•             Inclusive data collection and monitoring

•             Support for learners ( access to services inside and outside of the institution

•             Support for staff

Bobbie's picture

Raising the profile of LGBT - Project update

We have now recieved Adobe Captivate software so we are learning how to use that and we have started to create videos in Videoscribe. We have also been in contact with Stonewall regarding their "Train the Trainer" course, which will help us in the long term to educate our colleages

rosaleen.courtney's picture

BBC Somerset EDIF interviews

As part of a wider debate on helping adults with learning difficulties of disabilities to find work, our EDIFdefinition project featured. 

Our Project Manager, Jane, highlighted the advantages particularly for local small businesses and the interview with Bethan who has started work experience in catering with Nial really hit home. 

Scope, Aspire, the Federation of Small Businesses and Mike Penning, Minister for Disabled People added their views. 

 

It's on i-player for 7 days

listen on http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01qzw1d

The relevant sections are at 30 mins to 31.03; 35.59 – 44.05; 1:30 – 1:31.17; 1:35.4 - 1:45.26 approx

This is a great way to spread the word to a wider audience. 

We are hoping BBC Somerset will include another feature on understanding autism based on a presentation at our employer event. 

We'll keep you posted.  We'd welcome any comments or experiences from others.

 

Rosaleen

 

More... Check out our EDIF project page:

Sheila Halse's picture

EDIF support for younger BAME learners

mindfulmark's picture

The Mindful Deluge

Hi all

Just a quick update. We are now well into February and the project is hopefully doing what it set out to do. We have made connections with various GPdefinition practices and are receiving patient referals for our Mindfulness classes. In addition, NHSdefinition Mental Health Recoverydefinition, York MIND, York Carers, Outreach, Family Care, Primary Care Counselling Team and other organisations have either referred learners to us or shown an interest.

York has  recently been hit with the closure of Huntington Mental Health Centre and we believe our Mindfulness classes can help bridge this gap and promote equality by opening up Mindfulness and mental well-being interventions through learning to those in society who cannot afford private treatment. We understand that even local mental health charities have waiting lists, whilst free GP referrals can take up to 18 months.

The deluge of learners we are experiencing (130 a week study across all our Mindfulness classes) seem to suggest there is a real need for Mindfulness in the community. Moreover we feel we are only just brushing the surface of the need-potential within the city. Every time we offer our services, this seems to set off an avalanche of other oganisations wanting to learn about our classes. Only this last month we have had requests from as far away as Easingwold, plus interest from the local mental heatlh hospital, York College, various Council bodies and the local Job Centre to name but a few.

Sheila Halse's picture

Over 24 yr old BAME people looking for coaching and support

It seems that the body of text in last week's blog may have got lost in the either. So, here it is again 

 

 

The objective of our initiative was the coaching of 20 BAME people from across several programmes areas to help them progress on to other mainstream provision – from NEETs, Traineeships, and Apprenticeships, as well as the delayed Talent Match.  

 

So far the work has resulted in the development of new and existing partnerships representing a range of organisations throughout South Yorkshire including other a local University, training providers, supported housing providers, community groups, charities, cultural centres and voluntary organisations. As a result we have exceeded our target of 20 people and are now coaching .

 

Initially the project was to be focused on support to be offered to young people, and although details of Talent Match funding were not announced until early January, we continued with this initial strategy. However, the results of this have been that rather than having a high proportion of younger people, the BAME people who have most needed the support are over 24 years old. This is not specific to our project but is also the experiences of our partner organisations. From discussions with our partners and external research it seems that the reasons for this are inter-related.  The primary factors being the traditional educational path of some ethnic communities and the age groups of those who originally came from Europe from 2004 onwards.

 

One  example of the BAME people that we are currently supporting is Livia.

 

Livia is in her mid thirties and came to the United Kingdom with her husband eight years ago from Slovenia. She has three children under eight years old and, since arriving in the United Kingdom, has never had any paid employment.

Sheila Halse's picture

Over 24 yr old BAME people looking for coaching and support

It seems that the body of text in last week's blog may have got lost in the either. So, her it is again 

 

 

The objective of our initiative was the coaching of 20 BAME people from across several programmes areas to help them progress on to other mainstream provision – from NEETs, Traineeships, and Apprenticeships, as well as the delayed Talent Match.  

 

So far the work has resulted in the development of new and existing partnerships representing a range of organisations throughout South Yorkshire including other a local University, training providers, supported housing providers, community groups, charities, cultural centres and voluntary organisations. As a result we have exceeded our target of 20 people and are now coaching .

 

Initially the project was to be focused on support to be offered to young people, and although details of Talent Match funding were not announced until early January, we continued with this initial strategy. However, the results of this have been that rather than having a high proportion of younger people, the BAME people who have most needed the support are over 24 years old. This is not specific to our project but is also the experiences of our partner organisations. From discussions with our partners and external research it seems that the reasons for this are inter-related.  The primary factors being the traditional educational path of some ethnic communities and the age groups of those who originally came from Europe from 2004 onwards.

 

One  example of the BAME people that we are currently supporting is Livia.

 

Livia is in her mid thirties and came to the United Kingdom with her husband eight years ago from Slovenia. She has three children under eight years old and, since arriving in the United Kingdom, has never had any paid employment.

ReachTCsuac2013's picture

Moving forward!

The Reach Out Theatre Collective will hold it's first session on Monday of next week. There has been some interest in the project internally at Stratford upon Avon College and we are certain this will gather momentum as we officially open the project. Open evenings and email correspondence is steady with internal participants, but external interest is a little slow. However, I expect this to improve with more marketing of the project and specific targeting of relevant groups. It certainly feels as if we are now truly on our way!
EDIF_MorleyCollege's picture

Exploration of Equality and Diversity in the ESOL Classroom


Laila El-Metoui (Co-ordinator of the Educate Out Prejudicedefinition Project and ESOLdefinition tutor at Morley College) presented a discussion on Equalitydefinition and Diversity in the ESOL Classroom yesterday evening at the British Council. The talk was broadcasted live with a small international audience.


Here is the Youtube Link to the video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rkygkkowp60

 

You can see the slide about the Educate Out Prejudice Project at Morley College at around 45:00 mins.

We hope you enjoy the presentation and find it useful, please do leave some feedback or question on youtube, or email edif@morleycollege.ac.uk

 

Bobbie's picture

Raising the profile of LGBT at Sussex Coast College

Today we are celebrating LGBT in the college. We are asking staff and students to dress in rainbow colours and having a cake and sweet stall to raise awareness for LGBT groups of people in the college. We have rainbow flags and displays of posters and books in both the learning resource centres and a slide show of LGBT quotes and rainbow designs on the media boards and around the college during February LGBT history month.

 

It's great too that we can celebrate the posthumous pardon of the great mathematician and computer wizard (and enigma code breaker for WWII ) Alan Turing, who lived most of his young life in Hastings. We are naming our new Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) TURING and the road to one of Susex Coast College Campus is called Turing Way, in his honour.